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, must be because i was just so smart. there are a lot of smart people out there. bill: take us into the mind frame for a comment like that. white house would come out and argue and i imagine they will government has a purpose and that was the point the president was trying to make. the point you're making this goes back to his days a as community organizer. explain that. >> well, i think in essence when you're a community organizer you're basically dealing with a lot of people disadvantaged you're trying to get them government assistance or welfare checks or whatever and the other part of the story though is that people who are creating jobs are getting up every day and going to work and working very, very hard. this should be a campaign celebrating the american worker. his story in itself is successful story. bill: president obama. >> president obama. i think to certain extent but reflect as mindset. it is the mindset the contrast between what romney and his campaign will be about. we can again become a great leader of the world as we always have been. we can get americans bac
and later nora from the center from a new american security discuss it is future of iraq after u.s. troops are with drawn. >> good morning in what is expected to be the final week for congress before the august recess and the party conventions, the farm bill and the bush era tax cuts will take up much of the debate in the house of representatives, the senate also in session congress expected to recess friday or this weekend. the president back on the campaign trail. meanwhile republican presidential candidate mitt romney is in israel delivers a speech in poland before he returns to the states. today marks the 100-day mark, 100 days before the general election with the party conventions getting under way next month and in early september three presidential debates, a vice presidential debate and countless ads on television and in the web. we'll begin with your comments on this campaign. as always we want to hear from you. you can also join the conversation on line. you can join us on facebook or send us an e-mail. let's begin with norl which points out the november 6 elections just
us about that, alicia. >> reporter: yeah. judge william sylvester will also address the motions by the defense as well as by the media. 20 media organizations including fox news are requesting that records relating to the case be unsealed arguing that the public has a legitimate interest in knowing what actions were taken by multiple officials in the case including information relating to dr. lynn fenton. she is a psychiatrist at the university of colorado medical center, who according to court documents was treating holmes and to whom he sent a package. fox and other news outlets said that package contained a notebook which holmes reportedly dei would at that the killings. the defense has filed a motion that package be turned over immediately. bill: a lot to go through. alicia acuna thank you. the deeper it gets. more coming up on the story. holmes would potentially face hundreds of charges today. plus what about his behavior in and outside of the courtroom? is it an act? our panel will debate that. heather. heather: three of the victims were laid to recent over the weekend in
to be joined by a major general will join us with an update from afghanistan, from on the ground there. here is "the washington post "report on the same story -- winston-salem, n.c., republican caller -- what do you think about american exceptionalism? caller: if you're asking the non-working group, this is a great country because they live off of food stamps, medicaid, free housing but if you ask a middle-class, working class people, it is a terrible country because all you are doing is paying taxes and supporting the ones who don't work. you don't have enough money to buy insurance. you make too much, they will get medicaid. don't have enough money to buy groceries but you make too much to get food stamps. if you ask rich people, it is a great country because they are blind to what the four and they are robbing the country and blind to the middle class not being able to make ends meet? host: how you feel? caller: i follow the middle class. i am struggling to pay insurance and than obama care comes out and i don't see how that will help. he makes himself look like he is helping the country
and let them use it to increase the voice of private schools, strip you of your voice because he doesn't think that you all know much about how to educate, and he characterizes you and his allies characterize you as not caring about -- not caring about the students, but about yourself. my jill is little when she says that teaching is not what she does. it's who she is. [applause] these guys don't get that. i don't think they don't understand why you chose to teach in the first place. [applause] i honest to god don't think they understand. and by the way, like in politics, in business, religious hierarchy, there is really good teachers and there is really lousy teachers. there is a really lousy teachers and some plain good teachers. we are no different than any other profession in the world. but we are a profession. [applause] we are a profession! this is a calling. you chose to be teachers because you care. you choose to be teachers because you want to make this country better. you chose to be teachers because you know every child -- every child is entitled -- entitled to go as far as
and that often kills them. to put a little close on this and a chance for us to converse, what is fascinating is the degree of duality in the great executive we studied. for example, is it 20 mile marching or defining moment in their capacity to do both? 20 mile marches with discipline and superb performance in a defining luck event moments that are out of their control. why did they do so much better? in the book, we noticed that over time, great executives will recall people had the genius of "and"as opposed to the tyranny of "or." it is humility and will. it is confront the brutal facts and having faith. it is productive and paranoid. when we stand back and look at a truly great enterprise, we see a huge duality under any great enterprise. that is what we call, preserved because for and stimulate progress - the core and stimulate progress. no great company exists if it does not have a core or stimulates progress. they are willing to change their practices, their strategies, there structures without compromising core values. they understand the difference between their core values and their
of us benefit from this. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> how tragedy unites. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with the aftershock. after midnight tonight, we get through a week of this attack inside our country that killed 12 and wounded dozens more. so what's it done to us? what has this event stirred in this country? made us different from the people who watch this program, say, just a week ago. i want to know. i want to hear again the many separate human actions that night that tell us what kind of a country we are and where we are headed. i want to hear not just about the villain and the victims, but also the heroes. the impulsive good guys that night. the ones who showed what hemingway described as courage, grace under fire, and under pressure. i want to know how aurora is going to affect this country. us. today brought the announce many that denver, colorado, just miles from the tragedy will host the first presidential debate this autumn. this all but guarantees that the two president
of community. we used to care for each other and take care of each other and politics never got in the way. if someone lost their job, we all pitched in and took care of them until they got back on their feet. i think we've lost a little of that in the country. and when we band together in tragedies like this, it shows us what america could be. what we have to do is to do something to limit the possibility that something like this happens again. we can never eliminate the possibility but gosh, in the name of those victims, we ought to do something. >> i'm impressed when people turn on the tv and identify with something that happened 3,000 miles away. and they would not have identify with these people except their largely fellow americans. there is something american of ours that goes beyond politics and the sympathy, the real, i've been listening to another networks all week and it is something. >> it is amazing. it's something everybody can relate to. we all go to the movies. might daughter went to "dark night rises" the night before. i had all kinds of mixed feelings. those people went t
and wounded dozens more. so what's it done to us? what has this event stirred in this country? made us different from the people who watch this program, say, just a week ago. i want to know. i want to hear again the many separate human actions that night that tell us what kind of a country we are and where we are headed. i want to hear not just about the villain and the victims, but also the heroes. the impulsive good guys that night. the ones who showed what hemingway described as courage, grace under fire, and under pressure. i want to know how aurora is going to affect this country. us. today brought the announcement that denver, colorado, just miles from the tragedy, will host the first presidential debate this autumn. this all but guarantees that the two presidential candidates, president obama and mitt romney, will be asked about the tragedy. what should they say? let's ask governor ed rendell of pennsylvania what obama should say. and what rick thinks romney should say. it will be interesting. to start with, let's hear their personal stories following a tragedy like aurora. look
at noon and sunday at 5 eastern on the c-span2 adnd 3. >> bill gates says the u.s. higher education system has always been a strength for our nation and urged people to make it better for future generations. he was the keynote speaker and an event to mark the upcoming 150th anniversary of the law establishing funding for public colleges and universities through federal land grants. this is 50 minutes. >> we immediately agreed on a first choice, bill gates. someone who would not only help us recognize and celebrate the last 150 years, but challenge us and work with us in the decades ahead. together with his wife, they co- chair the bill and melinda gates educational foundation. it works to expand opportunities for people around the globe. there foundation is the leader in efforts to improve global health, alleviate poverty, and expand opportunities for women. and with particular significance today, increased access to and success in education. their efforts which span the globe are truly exciting. the work of the gates foundation is built on a simple premise, that all lives medical value. t
few people really know where the idea came from for the statue, so give us some insight into how it came into being. >> it came into being in france in the middle of the 19th century. it was 1865 right after the assassination of abraham lincoln, and a group of french people behind the radio were a emotionally tied to the united states. they love the american form of government, and they were abolitionists, so they have a particular affection for president lincoln, so they came together at the home of a man who was friends's leading specialist on the united states. smoke-filled died in 1859, -- toquevill died in 1859, so a group of guys got together, and the idea was to try to come up with a way of commemorating the life achievement to celebrate the victory of the north in the civil war and to make a critical on their own government. france had an authoritarian government run by napoleon iii, and it was a government that was friendly to liberty. they tried to put these together to commemorate abraham lincoln and a way of being critical to the government and so the ideath it, was t
a look. good morning. thursday, july 12th. mitt romney, staring at the naacp convention. with us former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve rattner. the executive editor of bloomberg news, al hunt and rounding out our michael bloomberg hour morning, columnist for bloomberg, margaret carlson. in new york, a man whose company i'm sure will be owned by michael bloomberg, executive editor at random house, "time" magazine contributing editor jon meacham and also editorial writer for "the washington post" and msnbc contributor jonathan capehart. jonathan. >> yeah. >> let's start with you. >> hey, joe. >> mitt romney, at the naacp convention. that just sort of -- like those old reesy's ads, two great tastes that go great together. not a natural audience for mitt romney and it didn't go especially well. why did he do it? >> i mean, i would hope he did it because what he says, you know, looking for every vote possible and wanted to show respect to the community and ask for their votes. but you don't go there and say that you are going to be better for the african-american
it was always pick as many fights as possible. no. i think -- i think you -- wherever you are, you use the event to your advantage and if you're going into a hostile audience -- for me, and i think usually for most politicians, it's to do what tim kaine is doing, by the way, from what i've heard across virginia very well, he's going to all of his enemies first and saying hey, listen, i understand you're not going to be with me, but i'm going to always listen to you. you know, i always would go into neutrals. on this stage, i don't think there was any doubt about it he was playing to conservatives, some would say cynically and he was playing to independents saying, hey, you know, all the stuff you heard about me i only tell people what they want to hear, watch this. and let me give you one more clip, here's mitt romney when he got booed talking about president obama's health care plan. >> i'm going to eliminate every nonessential expensive program i can find, that includes obama care, and i'm going to work to reform and save -- [ boo ] >> of course, steve rattner, throughout the day, mitt romney
, but a little patient with us here, but they are moving as quickly as they can. you can see what they are up against here, just the physical nature having to remove things like this. this scene is repeating over and over in the states. >> brian, stay with us. things are changing by the hour. brian todd reporting live in west virginia. and also this morning we are asking leaders from right across the region, how are you going to fix this thing? when is the power coming back for people? first, the mayor of lewisburg, john manchester, is going to join us at 6:30 eastern time. >>> more on the heat wave and when we expect relief. alexandra is in for rob marciano, what a horrible situation. folks are without power and a couple of hot days forecasted for these states. >>> places like minneapolis, the heat index or what it will feel like, 112 degrees there. one thing you'll notice waking up on the east coast to go out to get your paper, there's more moisture in the area. the dew point is higher than it's been, so temperatures for some along the eastern seaboard may not be as hot, but the uncomfortab
that came out this morning and that is retail sales? >> terrible. martha: what does that tell us about what is going on? >> it is a terrible number. sales in june declined .5%. that is huge decline and unexpected. it tells us the economy is clearly weakening. in may retail sales were down. june retail sales were down some more. and a new survey out of national economists and they say hiring is weakening all over again. so too are the sales figures which we just reported. they have a negative outlook. in fact, most of them are looking for growth rate in the economy of 2% or less. and that is not a solid performance. martha: yeah. there are so many indicators out there, stuart, as you point out that we're hitting yet another rough patch. >> yes, we are. martha: in the economy. stuart, thank you very much. good to see you as always this morning. bill: stuart was talking about the survey released by the national association of business economics. it says u.s. jobs growth appears worse than three months ago. of 67 economists surveyed, only 22% reported rising employment in july. that is down fro
's stand your ground law which allows someone with a reasonable fear of death to use deadly force. but zimmerman revealed he'd never heard of the statute before the shooting. the case gripped the nation. civil rights leaders protested the initial decision not to prosecute zimmerman. they argue the neighborhood watch man racially profile martin, a claim zimmerman strongly denies. >> i'm not a racist and i'm not a murderer. >> reporter: he blames a rush to judgment. >> i think that people assumed i was white because i my last name. my father's caucasian. my mother's hispanic. but english was my second language. >> reporter: and despite saying he had no regrets earlier in the interview, zimmerman closed by clarifying -- that he did wish he had not been forced to take martin's life. as he looked straight at the camera. >> i'm sorry that this happened. i hate to think that because of this incident, because of my actions, it's polarized and divided america. and i'm truly sorry. >> reporter: zimmerman never specifically addressed why he was speaking out now. fox news says it did not comp
northern syria and brings us the latest. >> reporter: fighting continued to rage in aleppo, syria's commercial can't. shelling neighborhoods taken by opposition forces desperately clinging on calling for heavier weapons. we crossed into syria early this morning, our first stop was a city which had seen heavy violence last month outside aleppo. there hardly seemed to be a single building left untouched. and virtually a ghost town. also remarkable was traveling all day across northern syria, we didn't see a single government tank or troop. which tells you how far these opposition forces have come. but until they take a city like aleppo they have a long way to go. >>> reporting there from inside syria. two big developments in syria. one, the chemical weapons, removed, transported, eyes of the world wondering if assad will use them, when, how? and the use of helicopters. the first in the last couple weeks. bombing his own people here. and defense secretary, panetta said using helicopters against his own people was a nail in his coffin. talk getting very, very tough. wondering if assad
care. >> i care. >> legitimate baseball fans care, but it certainly is not as big a deal as it used to be because of interleague play. we see different players from different teams in both leagues all during the year. you can get any game you want on your baseball package on cable. doesn't have the same allure that it used to, certainly. >> yeah. mika. >> yeah. >> the battle over the bush tax cuts. >> here we go again. >> here we go. >> now it's -- because we were talking yesterday on the set in new york about the limit, the $250,000 limit. that could come back. it's growing over how much of the bush-era tax cuts to extend just for the middle class, or, perhaps, for the wealthiest americans as well. both candidates invoked the 42nd president bill clinton to frame their strategies yesterday. take a listen. >> i mean, the very idea of raising taxes on small business and job creators at the very time we need more jobs, is the sort of thing only an extreme liberal could come up with. this is the sort of thing that used to be in the democratic party in the times past. bill clinton called
to be part of the olympics in any way you can be part of it. >> when is the event and for those of us that don't follow the sport is there rounds of competition, just one chance, what happens? >> i have to tell you, this is ann's sport. i'm not sure which day the sport goes on. she will get to see it. i will not be watching the event. i hope her horse does well. >> good morning. it's thursday, july 26th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle, hello, mike. i'm not going to say anything. don't you worry. you look quite fine today. >> thank you. >> msnbc political analyst and former chairman of the republican national committee, michael steele is with us. and msnbc political analyst and visiting professor at nyu, former democratic congressman harold ford jr. and, of course, willie geist in london for the olympics. >> how is your horse doing? >> he doesn't know the name of the horse, the event the horse is going in, and if there's actually a name of the event that has sort of a french flair to it he's not going to say it. >> dressage. >> could he
of hardship and uncertainty, you've seen the last few days some of the largest and most important u.s. companies report sagging profits, those who believe that the europe -- situation in europe would not directly affect u.s. companies are beginning to see they were more wrong than right. i think giving as much as you can to big companies, medi medium-sized and small companies around any and everything government will or won't do is critical. extending tax cuts for all americans going to solve all our fiscal cliff issues? no. short of congress being able to do something meaningful, sustainable they should probably extend the cuts for everyone and look forward to the beginning of next spring or next year deal with sequestration, long-term fiscal responsibility, sustainability, but short of that, i don't know how this gives any more certainty, any more comfort. as you've talked on the show many times in the past, to businesses across the nation. what concerns me, you see the front page of the newspapers, europe's crisis hits profits, rising food prices. american consumer and business lea
talks about how slaves used the u.s. mail to communicate with other slaves and how they planned and executed escapes to canada, mexico and the caribbean. held at penn state university this is an hour and 15 minutes. >> thank you, tony. that was almost ministerial. i feel as if i'm really in church now. okay. it's an honor to be here. thanks for making this possible. it's wonderful to be in penn state in march and see people in shorts. there is something to be said for global warming. let me suggest a couple of things as we start -- before we start rattling on tonight. one is i'm going to set this discussion these series of lectures beginning with the fugitive slave law of 1850. to me the pivotal political event in the decade leading up to the civil war. the fugitive slave law changes the political dynamics of this country in ways that nobody could have anticipated at the time. and at the center of that change in political dynamic are the activities of slaves themselves who run away. so what i am interested in looking at in the series of lectures then is how does the action of th
and he don't regret taking trayvon's life. had he stayed in his vehicle, trayvon would be with us today. >> i don't know he says he doesn't regreat aching his life. he says he wouldn't have done anything differently. he also says i can't imagine what it must feel like, i pray for them daily and then he also said this, and it getting a lot of attention this morning, "i feel it was all god's plan." mrs. fulton, what's your reaction to that? >> i think it's ridiculous. i wish trayvon was here to tell his side of the story. i don't believe it's god's plan for him to kill an innocent teen-ager. >> he said he was only pursuing your son that night and he said he only got out of of the car to give an exact address to the police. do you think that's what happened this evening? >> matt, it speaks for itself when you listen to the objective evidence. just listen to the 911 tapes. there's so many inconsistencies when they listen to those tapes. >> we don't know who initiated the confrontation between your son and george zimmerman. we do know it turned violent, both reached for a gun and it ended wi
before us. we just do. so i am very thankful to of the gibson and the other guys around that time, too, that were very good to me -- i am very thankful to althea gibson. we are all in this together, so we have to help each other. >> what do you think has been the biggest change in the last 20 years? >> that was not very long ago. i think it has been an evolution of equipment change. this is really like. -- light. this is like my security blanket. what i told my dad i wanted to play tennis, my dad said, "show me." i went to my neighbors and beg them to give me a job. when i had $8.29 sit up in a mason jar, i said i could not wait any longer and i went to brown's sporting goods and got my first racket. the salesperson said to me, "what kind do you want?" i asked what a dollars and 29 cents would buy. i got it because i loved the color. it was my favorite color. i would sleep with it every night and dream about winning and being number one. so when i see this, i love it. just like blindness, you know, with your blankie -- just like linus. the biggest thing is the materials in the rackets
class men. the polls are showing us while he is doing well with women and some other groups, this is a group that seems to be wavering between president obama and mitt romney. a recent average, shows the president with less than a three-point lead within the margin of error. on the fourth o of july, he addressed military members saying we need more immigration laws that allow immigrants to stay, like the dream act. mitt romney was up in new hampshire. while he tried to shy away from politics officially, he has been wrapped up in this debate over whether or not he contradicted himself in his campaign over the health care mandate. is it a penalty? is it a tax? romney says the supreme court called it a tax, so it is a tax. his campaign said otherwise. we will likely turn the focus back to the economy as new job numbers come out for june. lynn? >>> scientists at the large hadron collider have announced they have likely discovered the so-called god particle. it may explain how stars, planets, even life, how these things were created and held together. science editor, lawrence mcg
. every one of them. >> you remember where you were? >> absolutely. that brings us to our facebook question of the day this morning? >> what is your most memorable tv moment. make sure you weigh in at wnnfans.com. >> you can find the whole list at wnnfans.com. check that out. what sticks out in your mind? >> for me, obviously, september 11th. and the space shuttle. >> space shuttle. >> i still remember that. i was so young. totally. >> katrina for me. obviously, for personal reasons. watching the city flood was just nothing i will ever forget. >> you were there. working there. >> crazy. we'll be back with more right after this with more tv magic. >> announcer: abc's "world news now" will continue after this from our abc stati >>> welcome back, everyone. an 18-year-old woman will make history this weekend when she competes in the miss florida usa competition. >> that's because she's the first ever legally blind contestant. abc's matt gutman introduces us to connor boss. >> here we go. >> reporter: imagine practicing this choreography, packed among 75 other women in the cutthroat wor
, and from space we get the planets and us. this involves digging into atoms, deeper and deeper to reveal the incredibly small parts inside them so tiny it is not clear how they have any kind of substance. and that's where the higgs boson comes in, a particle that acts like glue, giving other particles mass. and 50 years of theory now momentous discovery unlocking new areas of research. peter higgs known as a quiet man is suddenly in the limelight. the particle he suggested in the '60s is recognized as fundamentally important. the giant machines that did research costs several billion pounds. and no one knows what spin-offs there might be. when the electron and dna were discovered it took decades to see their potential. the higgs boson could prove the same. david shukman, bbc news. >> that makes sense. >> it makes sense, yes. >> it makes a lot of sense. acts like glue and gives particles mass here. interesting side note, higgs is an atheist and hates the term god particle because of his religious belief. interesting. >> it is interesting. >> i was never good at physics. >> i understood th
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)